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20110711
20110711
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are accusing pakistan of doing. certainly the pakistanis feel very much under pressure. they do need the dollars, but not to the extent that we might think, because they do get a large proportion -- the pakistani army gets a large proportion of the domestic budget here, but it is the humiliation more than anything that will help the pakistani army. and yes, the two sides do need each other. nobody's talking about breaking up completely, but it's whether this will have the desired effect that washington wants or not, and that is something we simply can't tell right now. >> aleem maqbool. in syria, supporters of the government and so
aid to pakistan. they're with holding it, expelling military trainers and they hope holidaying back all that money will make pakistan crack down harder on militants and terrorists. what's the best way to describe the relationship with pakistan right now? >> they've been an important ally in the fight on terrorism, they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on aid which we have give on the their military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship in a difficult part of the world. >>> and here's a figure for you. $37 billion. according to them, that much money could vanish this year from pockets. two out of ten dollars americans took in came in the form of money from government and when those extended benefits go away by the end of the year, some $37 billion onto go into people's accounts and hence won't go into the economy. let e let's go to kristie lu stout for your morning hit from hong kong. christy good morning. >> good morning, ali. >> it begins after hours markets c
in military aid to pakistan, about one-third the annual total according to administration officials. relations between the two countries have been strained especially after the u.s. raid that kill add bin laden. only a short distance from pakistan's leading military academy. the might of those trying to survive the drought hit horn of africa is far outstripping the ability of anyone to help. u.n.'s chief refugee official said today the crisis in somalia alone is the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. to give an idea of the scale he was visiting a refugee camp the size of cleveland. tony guida has more. >> reporter: look into this child's eyes. he knows something you and i will never know, how it feels to be desperately hungry. there are many children like him in this hospital in mogadishu, malnourished children, some close to death, all refugees from the drought and violence destroying somalia. >> if you are a hungry person, somebody once told me it feels as if there is bleach in your belly. it hurts so much. >> bettina luescher speaks for the world food program, the oortion will feed 6
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way to control, to change those who are going to run their governments. and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators fall, you have put in place the basic institutions and procedures for getting responsive gov
, whether with iraq or iraq today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to sell the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it's going to be something where the people will have a way to control, change those who are going to run their government, and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators form and dictatorships are in p
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)